Sunday, November 11, 2012

Trust | Fundamental to Self-Improvement

Do you notice that when you are alone on the road to self-improve, you are solely responsible to your own learning?

This is very real.

Whatever goes into your brain determines your future action. With this new action, behaviour will change.

What are you learning?
Is the training material appropriate?
Do I trust the trainer and his material?

The above questions are important during the path of improvement.
You do want correct and relevant information, right?

However, the trust of your trainer is a very sensitive issue.
Do you TRUST his teaching?

If you do, he must have convinced you well. But do check his material off-line though.
Any reputable trainer has something good to share. He will not be there talking non-sense.
If in doubt, give him the benefit of the doubt first before checking and filtering the relevance.

The other case of trust is that you disbelief his teaching.
Why?
Question yourself.
If you are taking a course and you do not trust the words of the trainer, what more can you do?

As a learner, especially when you are alone, the only inputs are from somewhere else.
(Unless you re-invent some new materials !)
If you do not trust the trainer, how then do you improve.

If you do not trust the material, learning stops there right away.
You may be right. And terminates the learning if you have true doubt over the teaching.

But if you are caught, just note down whatever in question and starts to filter through after the session. This is, in fact, a crucial part of self-improvement; the selection of relevant material for acceptance.

In summary, TRUST is a very important step in learning and self-improving. If you start of doubting the words and material of the trainer, you are putting yourself in a disadvantaged position while the others move forward. Trust first and filter later will at least allow you to capture whatever the trainer is willing to share and for you to digest.

:-) Think about my point.  Comments welcomed.

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1 comment:

John DiLemme said...

Thanks for this information, it was very helpful. Keep up the good work.

John Di Lemme